Active Stretching is Best After Warming Up

By National Institute of Health, March 27, 2014

This is a link to a professional journal article on stretching for sports therapists provided by the National Institute of Health. It’s fairly technical, and contains a lot of information about their research, but their conclusion is interesting, which we’ve tried to summarize for you below.

Here is how they define “static stretching” in the article:


“Static stretching, where a specific position is held with the muscle on tension to a point of a stretching sensation and repeated.”


And here is their definition of “dynamic stretching”(we’ve added the italics):

“There are 2 types of dynamic stretching: active and ballistic stretching. Active stretching generally involves moving a limb through its full range of motion to the end ranges and repeating several times. Ballistic stretching includes rapid, alternating movements or ‘bouncing’ at end-range of motion; however, because of increased risk for injury, ballistic stretching is no longer recommended.”

And here is their conclusion:


“To avoid decrease in strength and performance that may occur in athletes due to static stretching before competition or activity, dynamic stretching is recommended for warm-up.”


In other words, it’s better to stretch in an active manner, where your limbs are moving through their range of motion. This is exactly the kind of dynamic stretching that takes place while rebounding.


Here’s the article information and a link:


CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION” by Phil Page, PT, PhD, ATC, CSCS, FACSM,  

International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, February, 2012.


LINK: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3273886/

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